Bout du Monde Music Festival: discover the Hendrix of the Sahara in the rain

For eleven years at the Festival Musique du Bout du Monde (FMBM), the show at the foot of Cap-Bon-Ami, in Parc Forillon, has always given way to magical moments and, despite the rain, the edition of this year with Malian guitarist Vieux Farka Touré, a show that sold out in 24 hours was no exception.

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Some 20,000 spectators gathered on the morning of Saturday to Sunday, August 14, 2022, at the Cap-Bon-Ami venue for a new show by Vieux Farka Touré, as part of the Festival Musique du Bout du Monde.  *NO RESALE / AUCUNE RESALE* PHOTO COURTESY / Roger St-Laurent / World Music Festival

“I hope you have fun soon. We should have done the show another day”, philosophized the one nicknamed by critics as the “Hendrix of the Sahara”, in one of his rare stops in Canada. Presenting mostly works from his most recent album, the virtuoso immersed each member of the audience in his universe.


Some 20,000 spectators gathered on the morning of Saturday to Sunday, August 14, 2022, at the Cap-Bon-Ami venue for a new show by Vieux Farka Touré, as part of the Festival Musique du Bout du Monde.  *NO RESALE / AUCUNE RESALE* PHOTO COURTESY / Roger St-Laurent / World Music Festival

To facilitate listening in this difficult climate, the organization of the event offered each audience a blanket, an umbrella, coffee and pastries for the show. With this paraphernalia, the festival attendees had almost forgotten the accumulation of drops while listening to the African artist in the company of his musicians, percussionist Adama Koné and bassist Marshall Henry. “The rain is also a musician that accompanies us,” joked the son of the late Ali Touré.

Although shy, we could see that the crowd seemed to be having a lot of fun during the performance. Some even risked getting out of their umbrella shells to sketch out some dance steps. Closing your eyes, it was easy to transport yourself to sub-Saharan Africa through the melody of the songs. However, it would have been nice to have the history of the few songs in Bambara and Shonghai, such as “Samba Si Kairi” to better connect with the trio of artists.

In his few interventions with the public, Vieux Farka thanked the festival organization for “having done everything possible” so that his percussionist had his visa to play in Canada. “Many would have let the situation go like this, saying that this story would not be their responsibility, but they did not disappoint us in this situation, and that is greatly appreciated,” he stressed, visibly moved by the gesture.

At the end of the show, the trio went to the merchandise booth to greet their audience. The trio is one of the few artists at the event to take this initiative, an approach that particularly moved the Gaspé public and the many visitors.

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